Do guitar strings change pitch with temperature?

The answer is yes.. The fact is metal will contract and expand depending on temperature. There are important points to consider. Strings are under tension. Other variables are any expansion of wood, other metal parts, and plastics which is hard to separate from string expansion.

An octave contains 1200 cents the human ear can detect about a 5 cent variation. So a 10 degree change in temperature may not be audible .

Here is the results from a scientific experiment



The data gathered from this experiment does support the hypothesis; as the temperature increased, the tuning fell flat. As the temperature was colder, the tuning became sharp. According to the data in the graph, “The Effect of Temperature

Do guitar strings change pitch with temperature?

The answer is yes.. The fact is metal will contract and expand depending on temperature. There are important points to consider. Strings are under tension. Other variables are any expansion of wood, other metal parts, and plastics which is hard to separate from string expansion.

An octave contains 1200 cents the human ear can detect about a 5 cent variation. So a 10 degree change in temperature may not be audible .

Here is the results from a scientific experiment
on the Tuning of an Acoustic Guitar,” the data suggested that, as temperature increases above 70°F, the tuning begins to fall flat. If the temperature is at 70°F or below, then the tuning becomes sharp. Therefore, the tuning will stay the most consistent if the temperature is kept at a temperature of 75°F. The averages also reflect the overall trend of the data. The range shows that the overall variation in the results of the data were minimal in musical terms; the largest range, 19 cents, is 0.01583 of an octave, or 0.19 of a semi-tone. The smallest standard deviation was 3.84; the largest was 5.70. This shows that the margin of difference is small. The error bar lengths all range from 1.11 to 1.65, indicating a small margin of error. The line of best fit shows that, for every 10 degrees the temperature increases, with the value “1” being used as 60° in the equation, 0 being used as 50°, 2 being used as 70°, and so forth, the tuning falls flat 6.624 cents. It also shows that, when the temperature is 50°F, the tuning will be sharp 14.08 cents. The line of best fit therefore conveys an inverse relationship; as the temperature increases, the tuning falls flat. The results of this research apply to any guitar player, whether they are on a professional level or just play as a hobby. It will help any guitar